The Great Wave off Kanagawa | Oil Painting Reproduction
75 cm
52
cm
The Great Wave off Kanagawa
Artist: Katsushika Hokusai
Size: 52 x 75 cm (20.5 x 29.5")
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Price: $309.00
Selected size: 52 x 75 cm (20.5 x 29.5")

Hokusai Great Wave

Under the Wave off Kanagawa, otherwise known as The Great Wave, is Katsushika Hokusai’s true masterpiece. Created between 1830 and 1832, it’s also one of the most recognizable images of Japanese art.

The print is a “yoko-e” which specifically refers to landscape artworks created in ōban size (roughly 25 centimeters by 37 centimeters).

This small woodcut depicts three boats threatened by an enormous wave. The scene lies just off Sagami Bay (in the Kanagawa Prefecture), with Mount Fuji just visible in the background.

Why did Katsushika Hokusai paint The Great Wave?

The Great Wave forms part of a larger collection, a series entitled Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji. Within this work, Hokusai offers fascinating glimpses into everyday Japanese life and landscapes.

Hokusai’s exact inspirations for creating this composition remain shrouded in mystery. We know he held an enduring artistic fascination (verging on obsession) with the famous mountain, however.

As the name suggests, every scene features Mount Fuji in some way. It sometimes dominates the pictorial space, sometimes offering just a mere glimpse in the background.

Hokusai spent his early career (from the age of twelve) working in a bookstore. Later employed as an engraver and an apprentice to the legendary Katsukawa Shunshō, Hokusai had immense knowledge of artistic techniques and practices.

He only produced Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji at the age of 70, although he created many The Great Wave paintings throughout his long career. This included View of Honmoku off Kanagawa (c.1803) and Cargo Boat Passing through Waves (c.1805). Both works present similar views of small ships dwarfed by towering waters.

What does Katsushika Hokusai’s The Great Wave off Kanagawa symbolize?

Fiercely debated amongst art historians, The Great Wave of Kanagawa meaning is a topic of intense interest. In this woodcut, Japan’s grandest mountain appears as a small, seemingly insignificant detail amidst a swirling wave.

The wave appears as an enormous, shifting monster, perhaps symbolizing the power of nature. It almost crushes the comparatively tiny boats drawn into its undulating motion. As “oshiokuri-bune”, these fast boats primarily transported live fish to Japan’s thriving coastal markets.

Not only does Mount Fuji provide perspective to the piece, but it also represents stillness and solidity. In Japanese culture, Mount Fuji is a sacred object of worship as well as an emblem of national identity and beauty. It also links to ideas of immortality and eternity within Buddhist and Daoist tradition.

Indeed, a popular interpretation of the mountain’s name suggests “Fu-Shi” which translates directly as “not death”. For Katsushika Hokusai paintings, it could represent his own ambitions for artistic immortality.

Contrasting this however, is the unceasing unpredictability of the ocean. This is the life and death, white and dark, the essential opposites that fascinate all great artists.

The wave’s claw-like white foam contrasts with the Prussian Blue and Indigo pigments forming the depths of Hokusai’s ocean. Prussian Blue was a relatively new material at the time, one which Hokusai took full advantage of.

Where is the original Hokusai Wave?

Katsushika Hokusai’s The Great Wave is held (alongside a large collection of other Hokusai and Japanese art) by the Metropolitan Museum in New York. Given the series was incredibly popular, it’s likely around 5,000 copies were produced.

It’s thus incredibly difficult to pin-point one single original Katsushika Hokusai art. Original impressions are also held by the Art Institute of Chicago, Claude Monet’s Giverny home, the Brussels Art and History Museum and the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe in Hamburg.

Under the Wave off Kanagawa, otherwise known as The Great Wave, is Katsushika Hokusai’s true masterpiece. Created between 1830 and 1832, it’s also one of the most recognizable images of Japanese art.

The print is a “yoko-e” which specifically refers to landscape artworks created in ōban size (roughly 25 centimeters by 37 centimeters).

This small woodcut depicts three boats threatened by an enormous wave. The scene lies just off Sagami Bay (in the Kanagawa Prefecture), with Mount Fuji just visible in the background.

Why did Katsushika Hokusai paint The Great Wave?

The Great Wave forms part of a larger collection, a series entitled Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji. Within this work, Hokusai offers fascinating glimpses into everyday Japanese life and landscapes.

Hokusai’s exact inspirations for creating this composition remain shrouded in mystery. We know he held an enduring artistic fascination (verging on obsession) with the famous mountain, however.

As the name suggests, every scene features Mount Fuji in some way. It sometimes dominates the pictorial space, sometimes offering just a mere glimpse in the background.

Hokusai spent his early career (from the age of twelve) working in a bookstore. Later employed as an engraver and an apprentice to the legendary Katsukawa Shunshō, Hokusai had immense knowledge of artistic techniques and practices.

He only produced Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji at the age of 70, although he created many The Great Wave paintings throughout his long career. This included View of Honmoku off Kanagawa (c.1803) and Cargo Boat Passing through Waves (c.1805). Both works present similar views of small ships dwarfed by towering waters.

What does Katsushika Hokusai’s The Great Wave off Kanagawa symbolize?

Fiercely debated amongst art historians, The Great Wave of Kanagawa meaning is a topic of intense interest. In this woodcut, Japan’s grandest mountain appears as a small, seemingly insignificant detail amidst a swirling wave.

The wave appears as an enormous, shifting monster, perhaps symbolizing the power of nature. It almost crushes the comparatively tiny boats drawn into its undulating motion. As “oshiokuri-bune”, these fast boats primarily transported live fish to Japan’s thriving coastal markets.

Not only does Mount Fuji provide perspective to the piece, but it also represents stillness and solidity. In Japanese culture, Mount Fuji is a sacred object of worship as well as an emblem of national identity and beauty. It also links to ideas of immortality and eternity within Buddhist and Daoist tradition.

Indeed, a popular interpretation of the mountain’s name suggests “Fu-Shi” which translates directly as “not death”. For Katsushika Hokusai paintings, it could represent his own ambitions for artistic immortality.

Contrasting this however, is the unceasing unpredictability of the ocean. This is the life and death, white and dark, the essential opposites that fascinate all great artists.

The wave’s claw-like white foam contrasts with the Prussian Blue and Indigo pigments forming the depths of Hokusai’s ocean. Prussian Blue was a relatively new material at the time, one which Hokusai took full advantage of.

Where is the original Hokusai Wave?

Katsushika Hokusai’s The Great Wave is held (alongside a large collection of other Hokusai and Japanese art) by the Metropolitan Museum in New York. Given the series was incredibly popular, it’s likely around 5,000 copies were produced.

It’s thus incredibly difficult to pin-point one single original Katsushika Hokusai art. Original impressions are also held by the Art Institute of Chicago, Claude Monet’s Giverny home, the Brussels Art and History Museum and the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe in Hamburg.

Reflecting the continued importance of the work, the museum purchased the print for £130,000, back in 2008

We offer a 100% money back guarantee or replacement service. If for any reason you are dissatisfied with your painting please contact us within 7 days of receipt, advising the reason you are unhappy and we will provide you with all the information you need for its return or replacement.

We ship free to anywhere in the world via FedEx or DHL expedited service with online tracking.

Your painting will be shipped rolled in strong plastic tubing, ready for stretching and/or framing locally. This is the conventional method of transporting hand-painted oil on canvas. Learn more about how your painting is shipped.

We are able to offer a framing service intercontinental U.S. Please contact us if you would like a quotation. Alternatively, should you prefer, we can recommend a framer in your area.

Notes About Your Painting

Please note that replica oil paintings are finished with an additional 10cm (4") of extra canvas on all sides, allowing ample surplus canvas for stretching and framing.

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Why settle for a poster or paper art print when you can own a real oil painting on canvas? This is a hand painted oil painting reproduction of a masterpiece, by a talented artist no electronic transfer methods are employed.
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